kiss of vanity

tell me a secret   my face   

"The heart is forever inexperienced."
-Henry David Thoreau

"I want to be with you,
it is as simple,
and as complicated as that."
Charles Bukowski (via hollowstimulation)

(Source: ephe, via gamerspirit)

— 12 hours ago with 101839 notes
#ahh stop reblogging bukowski its making me angsty 

pinkhairandbubblegum:

In his series, The Good Badlands, photographer Guy Tal seeks to show us that though it is often hidden, and may only appear briefly, there is delicate and subtle beauty in abundance for any viewer with patience and desire.

(Source: cubebreaker, via capturethecastle)

— 14 hours ago with 112905 notes
"all new learning looks at first
like chaos."
Adrienne Rich, from “Powers Of Recuperation (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via gamerspirit)

— 14 hours ago with 3391 notes
"

At a lecture I was giving in a large West Coast university in the Spring of 2008, the female students talked extensively about how much they preferred to have a completely waxed pubic area as it made them feel “clean,” “hot” and “well groomed.” As they excitedly insisted that they themselves chose to have a Brazilian wax, one student let slip that her boyfriend had complained when she decided to give up on waxing. Then there was silence. I asked the student to say more about her boyfriend’s preferences and how she felt about his criticism. As she started to speak other students joined in, only now the conversation took a very different turn. The excitement in the room gave way to a subdued discussion on how some boyfriends had even refused to have sex with non-waxed girlfriends as they “looked gross.” One student told the group how her boyfriend bought her a waxing kit for Valentine’s Day, while yet another sent out an email to his friends joking about his girlfriend’s “hairy beaver.” No, she did not break up with him, she got waxed instead.

Two weeks after the waxing discussion, I was at an East Coast Ivy League school where some female students became increasingly angry. They accused me of denying them free choice in their embracing of our hypersexualized porn culture, and being the next generation’s elite women, this idea was especially repugnant because they saw no limits or constraints on them as women. Literally two minutes later, one of the students made a joke about the “trick” that many of them employ as a way to avoid hookup sex. What is this trick? These women purposely don’t shave or wax as they are getting ready to go out that night so they will feel too embarrassed to participate in hookup sex. As she spoke, I watched as others nodded their heads in agreement. When I asked why they couldn’t just say no to sex, they informed me that once you have a few drinks in you, and are at a party or a bar, it is too hard to say no. I was speechless, not least because they had just been arguing that I had denied them agency in my discussion of porn culture, and yet they saw no contradiction in telling me that they didn’t have the agency to say no to sex. The next day I flew to Utah to give a lecture in a small college, which although not a religious college, had a good percentage of Mormons and Catholics. I told them about the lecture the previous night and asked them if they knew what the trick was. It turns out that trick is everywhere, including Utah.

I tell this story because, on many levels, it neatly captures how the porn culture is affecting young women’s lives. The reality is that women don’t need to look at porn to be profoundly affected by it because images, representations, and messages of porn are now delivered to women via pop culture. Women today are still not major consumers of hard-core porn; they are, however, whether they know it or not, internalizing porn ideology, an ideology that often masquerades as advice on how to be hot, rebellious, and cool in order to attract (and hopefully keep) a man. An excellent example is genital waxing, which first became popular in porn (not least because it makes the women look pre-pubescent) and then filtered down into women’s media such as Cosmopolitan, a magazine that regularly features stories and tips on what “grooming” methods women should adopt to attract a man. Sex and the City, that hugely successful show with an almost cult following, also used waxing as a storyline. For instance, in the movie, Miranda is chastised by Samantha for “letting herself go” by having pubic hair.

"
— 21 hours ago with 4007 notes
#incredibly interesting 

We don’t need the prince to slay the dragon, we’re just as capable as any man. We are the heroes of the adventure, and we can write the story on our own. (inspired by)

(Source: fromthetreetop, via capturethecastle)

— 21 hours ago with 24522 notes
"People run from rain but sit in bathtubs full of water."
Charles Bukowski (via foryouforeverago)

(via gamerspirit)

— 1 day ago with 2549 notes
humansofnewyork:

"He called and said that he was going to commit suicide if I left him. But he’d already blackmailed me so many times before, and I was so tired of it, that I told him I didn’t care and hung up. When I called back three hours later, a cop answered the phone."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"He called and said that he was going to commit suicide if I left him. But he’d already blackmailed me so many times before, and I was so tired of it, that I told him I didn’t care and hung up. When I called back three hours later, a cop answered the phone."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

— 1 day ago with 4596 notes
humansofnewyork:

"I don’t know much about him. My aunt tells me that he was smart and funny, and that I’m a lot like him because I’m stubborn. I know that I have his nose. But other than that, he’s just the man who walked out on me and my mother. He’d call every few months when I was really young, but eventually that stopped. I can’t convince myself that he’s mean, because then I’ll be angry forever. I’m sure plenty of people who know him think that he’s a really nice guy.""Would you like to know him?""I can’t say that I want to know him really, but I would like to know about him. I’d like to see how he behaves, how he walks, if he seems different than the other people I see on the street. I’m interested in his story just like I’m interested in everyone else’s story. Only a little more so, because I’m a part of his story."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"I don’t know much about him. My aunt tells me that he was smart and funny, and that I’m a lot like him because I’m stubborn. I know that I have his nose. But other than that, he’s just the man who walked out on me and my mother. He’d call every few months when I was really young, but eventually that stopped. I can’t convince myself that he’s mean, because then I’ll be angry forever. I’m sure plenty of people who know him think that he’s a really nice guy."
"Would you like to know him?"
"I can’t say that I want to know him really, but I would like to know about him. I’d like to see how he behaves, how he walks, if he seems different than the other people I see on the street. I’m interested in his story just like I’m interested in everyone else’s story. Only a little more so, because I’m a part of his story."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

— 2 days ago with 3840 notes

navalenigma:

shayvaalski:

friendlycloud:

agewa:

“We went to Kineshma, that’s in Ivanovo region, to visit his parents. I went as a heroine and I never expected someone to welcome me, a front-line girl, like that. We’ve gone through so much, we’ve saved lives, lifes of mothers, wives. And then… I heard accusations, I was bad-mouthed. Before that I’ve only ever been “dear sister”… We had tea and my husband’s mother took him aside and started crying: “Who did you marry? A front-line girl… You have two younger sisters. Who’s going to marry them now?” When I think back to that moment I feel tears welling up. Imagine: I had a record, I loved it a lot. There was a song, it said: you have the right to wear the best shoes. That was about a front-line girl. I had it playing, and [his?] elder sister came up and broke it apart, saying: you have no rights. They destroyed all my photos from the war… We, front-line girls, went through so much during hte war… and then we had another war. Another terrible war. The men left us, they didn’t cover our backs. Not like at the front.” from С.Алексеевич “У войны не женское лицо”

In Soviet Union women participating in WWII were erased from history, remaining as the occasional anecdote of a female sniper or simply as medical staff or, at best, radio specialists. The word “front-line girl” (frontovichka) became a terrible insult, synonimous to “whore”. Hundreds thousand of girls who went to war to protect their homeland with their very lives, who came back injured or disabled, with medals for valor, had to hide it to protect themselves from public scorn. 

This has always happened in history: Women do something important. Then they get shamed for it (so nobody will talk about it) and it gets erased from history.

And then certain men will say: “Women suck, they’ve never done anything important.”

Look into history and learn that women have played a far greater role then douches (present and past) wanted you to know.

Hey Will (and Jack) I got you something.

So this is important. Let me tell you a story.

All the time I spend debating about women in combat, I’ve picked up on a trend that disturbs me. Supporting or attacking, people are quick to draw on biology, psychology, law, but very rarely - almost never - do I hear about the history of women in combat, and the evidence their service lends to this debate.

Hundreds of thousands of women faced combat in WW2, and on both sides, and on all fronts, and it is a history that has been almost completely erased from contemporary awareness. I have been given arguments about how women can not psychologically handle combat. And about how women in mixed-gender combat units will automatically disrupt group cohesion - the brotherhood, if you will. Both of these assertions are erasure.

Women have not lived in a protective bubble untouched by combat for all of history. Women have been killed, wounded, and captured in combat, and tortured after. We are not living a world where these are hypothetical situations women have yet to prove they can handle. Unfortunately, they have, they can, in the future, they probably will, again and again. Soviet women served as partisans, snipers, tank drivers, fighter pilots, bombers. And more.

Both British and American women served in mixed-gender AA units. I could drag you through several examples of British women performing exemplarilyy despite being wounded, or seeing their comrades die. The Luftwaffe did not discriminate. Between the British and the Americans, it was determined that mixed gender units actually performed much better than all male units, because of teamwork. Because women are better and certain tasks, men are better at certain tasks, and at other tasks they are comparably efficient, and in a team, hopefully, in combat, you let the best do what they are best at. For the most part, they were proud to serve together. 

German propaganda never commented on the British AA units, but they thoroughly smeared the Soviet fighting woman - flitenweiber. People often argue with me that women are a threat to group cohesion because men naturally give women preferential treatment. Which certainly explains why men are more likely to survive shipwrecks. And history shows us that Germans soldiers had no chivalrous compunction when it came to shooting captured Soviet women who were armed.

We’re fed a history of war that almost exclusively features white male figures, most of whom fit into this destructive constructed myth of the soldier that is somehow both chivalrous and charmingly womanizing and who’s sense of brotherhood is unshakably dependent on the band being all man. There is no history of woman at war, none. I hear a lot about how women have no upper body strength, I hear nothing about the Front-Line Female Comrade.

(Source: castel-coronado, via capturethecastle)

— 3 days ago with 49466 notes
#history  #women